Wednesday, February 24, 2021

The bat virus warning could be the next pandemic


The Nipah virus originated from fruit bats, which scientists have noted as a serious concern. Reply to news agency The Sun In the UK, Dr. Melanie Saville, director of vaccine research and development at the Alliance for Disease Preparedness Innovation (CEPI) warns the world to prepare for the next “great pandemic”.

This warning comes after the scientists report on zoonotic diseases, where humanity is facing an increased risk of outbreaks most likely due to the cause. Human is transmitted from animals.

The report notes the collision between man and nature, as urbanization pushes the natural habitat of animals behind. The first recorded cases of Nipah virus infecting pig farmers in Malaysia follow this scenario. More than one million pigs believed to be infected with the Nipah virus from eating infected mango bats were slaughtered in Malaysia to prevent them from being transmitted to humans.

Pigs that eat infected mangoes from bats also become carriers. Photo: Alamy.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the Nipah virus (NiV) is a virus that spreads from animals to humans that can be transmitted through contaminated food or directly between people. People infected with this virus will experience illnesses ranging from asymptomatic (subclinical) infection to acute respiratory disease and even death from encephalitis.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also report many symptoms of the disease including fever, vomiting, headache, disorientation, convulsions and even coma. The CDC also notes that symptoms usually appear four to 14 days after exposure to the virus.

Nipah virus was first recorded in 1999 in Malaysia. No other outbreaks have been recorded in this Southeast Asian country since. It has also been reported in Bangladesh, starting in 2001. According to the WHO report, almost every year, the country experiences viral outbreaks.

WHO also said that Cambodia, Ghana, Philippines, Indonesia, Madagascar and Thailand are at risk of infection due to detection of natural reservoirs of the virus, mainly Pteropus bats.

Previous outbreaks recorded in parts of Asia were of concern as its mortality rates ranged from 40 to 75%. In contrast, according to a Royal College report cited by The Sun, the death rate for Covid-19 is only about 1%. This makes an outbreak of Nipah virus potentially more dangerous.

Nipah virus brain edema is not the only pandemic threat

Virus warning from bats causing brain edema could be the next - -0 pandemic
Scientists fear that if the Nipah virus is modified to be easier to metabolize, it will cause more deaths. Photo: Reuters.

Although the Nipah virus is more threatening than the Covid-19 pandemic, it is not the only one – there are 260 of them, all capable of causing disease.

Dr. Rebecca Dutch, Dean of the Department of Cellular and Molecular Biochemistry, University of Kentucky, adds that although there is no current global outbreak of the disease, it does occur cyclically.

“Nipah is one of those viruses that could completely be the cause of the new pandemic. Some things about Nipah are very interesting,” Dr Dutch told Dr Dutch. The Sun.

Many other viruses in the same family spread between people, she added, increasing the likelihood that a more contagious variant of the Nipah virus might exist in the future.

Dr. Saville also warned: “The most important thing is that we should not be concerned only with the Nipah virus”, noting how other emerging infectious diseases have been recognized as having pandemic potential, among them includes unidentified pathogens currently tagged as “Disease X”.

According to the EcoHealth Alliance, out of 1.67 million unknown viruses on the planet, there are 827,000 viruses capable of transmitting to humans from animals.

In a study published above Nature Communications, Southeast Asia, South and Central Africa, the areas around the Amazon and eastern Australia were identified as the areas most at risk of new illness.

Virus warning from bats causing brain edema could be the next - -0 pandemic
Scientists need to do more research on vaccines to be ready for the next pandemic. Photo: Getty Images.

“With environmental changes such as climate change, habitat destruction and human encroachment into previously isolated areas, human interaction creates a zero. fertile time for viruses to penetrate between species, ”Ms. Saville said.

Dr. Saville added that CEPI is looking into producing a prototype vaccine library that can target all corona viruses at once.

According to her, based on what scientists have learned from Covid-19, they will try and eliminate the risk of a pandemic in the future.



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